Bulletin (February 22, 2004)

This Wednesday we begin the holy season of Lent. During the day we will have various Masses and services at which you can receive ashes on the forehead. Do not be afraid to wear them during the day. It can be a powerful reminder to others – and to yourself. Also Ash Wednesday and all seven Fridays of Lent are days of abstinence from meat. This is a good discipline which will promote both spiritual and physical health. Please consider participating in the Lenten activities here at Holy Family:

Stations of the Cross followed by soup supper (Friday evenings at 6:30 p.m.)

The Fr. Corapi Retreat (March 5-6)

Children’s Stations of the Cross (Wednesdays at 2:15 p.m.)

Cathedral Walk (March 13, 7 a.m.)

Infant of Prague Novena (March 17-25)

Mark Shea Conference (April 3)

Below is a picture of the Brigittine Monks which I took during my retreat. Brother Simon (formerly Roger Thibodeau) is in the bottom row, far right.

During Lent we will have an amplified schedule for the Sacrament of Reconciliation. Besides Saturdays 9-10 a.m. and Wednesday at 7:30 p.m., confessions are scheduled on March 4, 6-8 p.m.; March 30, 4-8 p.m., April 6, 7 p.m., April 10, 10-12 a.m. and during the Fr. Corapi Retreat and Mark Shea Conference.

An area of sin and shame that has affected us all is the sexual abuse of minors by clergy. This Friday the bishops will release a report which aims at understanding the scope and underlying causes. Hopefully the report will help answer significant questions: What part of the abuse was genuine pedophilia and what part was homosexuality? What percentage of dioceses (like Seattle) instituted protective measures and have had no new cases since the late 80's? How does the Catholic Church compare with other institutions in terms of the scope of abuse and the response by authorities?

Archbishop Brunett has written the following Letter to the Faithful of Western Washington regarding the report. Besides printing it in the bulletin, we will read the letter at all Masses:

Next week, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops will release a report on the sexual abuse of minors by Catholic clergy from 1950 to 2002. This study was initiated by the bishops so that all of us may better understand the scope of the crisis and its underlying causes.

I would again like to express my deep regret that any child or young person was ever harmed by a priest or by anyone serving on behalf of the church. These tragic incidents are contrary to the will of Christ who showed tender care for children, and I know my predecessors share my remorse.

You also may trust that healing for victims and the protection of our children are priorities in our Archdiocese. Programs and policies were put in place by my predecessors and I have continued to build on these policies to improve our pastoral care for victims. In addition I have implemented training and background checks for all employees that have proven extremely effective. I have appointed an Archdiocesan Review Board to review our policies periodically and to make recommendations relating to accused priests to determine if they should be removed from ministry. These and many other steps are necessary to ensure that every child in our care is safe.

At the same time, it would be a mistake to allow the very real problems of the past to diminish our appreciation for the vast majority of good priests serving in our diocese, or to obscure what the church has done and is currently doing to deal with the problem of sexual abuse of minors. In 1993, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops provided general guidelines to every diocese in the country. Here in the Archdiocese of Seattle our efforts date back to 1987.

As media reports based on the release of the national study surface next week, I ask that you inform yourselves about this issue by reading the Catholic Northwest Progress and visiting the archdiocesan website at www.seattlearch.org. In addition, I ask you to join me in prayer for the healing and reconciliation of those who were abused, mercy for those who committed these crimes and for God’s peace and grace on our church as we work to heal the wounds of the past and look to the future with hope.

With sincerest regards and wishes, I remain

Your servant in Christ,

Most Rev. Alex J. Brunett

Archbishop of Seattle

Este miércoles comenzamos el “tiempo fuerte” de la Cuaresma. Durante el día habrá varios servicios y misas cuando se puede recibir la ceniza. No tengas miedo de llevarlas en su frente durante el día. También Miércoles de Ceniza y los siete viernes de Cuaresma son días de abstinencia de carne. Es una buena disciplina para la salude espiritual y física. Habrá varias actividades en la parroquia durante la Cuaresma:

Vía Crucis (antes cena de sopa a las 7 p.m. los viernes).

El retiro del Padre Corapi (5-6 marzo)

Caminata a la Catedral (13 de marzo a las 7 p.m.)

Retiro del Padre Francisco (15 al 19 de marzo)

Novena al Santo Niño de Praga (17-25 de marzo)

Conferencia de Mark Shea (3 de abril)

Sacramento de Reconciliación - horario ampliado durante la Cuaresma Además de los Sábados de 9-10 a.m. y miércoles a las 7:30 p.m., Habrá confesiones el 4 de marzo de 6 a 8 p.m., 30 de marzo de 4 a 8 p.m. y 6 de abril, 7 p.m. y 10 de abril 10-12 a.m. y durante los retiros.

Un campo de pecado y vergüenza que nos ha afectado a todos es el abuso sexual de menores por clérigos. El día viernes saldrá un reporte para entender las dimensiones y causas. Hay preguntas importantes: ¿Qué parte del abuso era pedofilía y que parte la homosexualidad? ¿Qué porcentaje de diócesis (como Seattle) instituyeron medidas para proteger menores durantes los años 80 y no han tenido nuevos casos desde aquel tiempo? ¿Cómo compara la Iglesia Católica con otras instituciones en cuanto a las dimensiones del abuso y la respuesta de autoridades? El arzobispo ha una carta sobre el reporte que vamos a leer este domingo en las misas.